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Killamarsh Infant and

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Science

National Curriculum for Science

 

Purpose of study

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

 

Aims

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future

Below are word documents to show the New National Curriculum Content in all year groups for Science.

 

Click a year group to view information about the areas of content that our children will be taught and will be learning about.

What does your child learn in Science in Key Stage 1?

Throughout Key Stage 1 science lessons, your child will be learning about the importance of asking questions, gathering evidence, carrying out experiments and looking at different ways of presenting their results. Lessons are practical and will focus on the world around them.k

In Key Stage 1 your child will learn to use the following methods, processes and skills:

  • asking simple questions (for example, 'What would happen if I didn't give a plant water?')
  • observing closely, using simple equipment such as a magnifying glass
  • identifying and classifying
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions
  • gathering and recording data to help in answering questions

Year 1 science                                              

Children in Year 1 will learn about:

  • Plants, identifying and naming plants and looking at their basic structure
  • Animals including humans, identifying and naming a range of animals and understanding how and why they are grouped (e.g. mammals, birds, amphibians etc)
  • Everyday materials, looking at their properties
  • Seasonal changes, observing changes across the four seasons and looking at different types of weather

Year 2 science                                              

Children will be looking at:

  • Living things and their habitats, including dependence within habitats and micro-habitats
  • Plants, observing how seeds and bulbs grow into plants and what plants need to stay healthy
  • Animals including humans, focusing on reproduction, nutrition and exercise
  • Everyday materials, comparing their uses and looking at how they can be changed by exerting force.

 

Help your child with Science at home

  •  Show your child plants or pictures of plants, such as apple trees, tomato plants, sweet corn, and cabbages and ask them why it is important for humans to grow plants.
  • Plant seeds at home. Talk about the things plants need to grow, such as soil, water, light and air. Help them to observe the changes as the plants begin to grow.
  • Do you have a pet? Help your child to point out the similarities between animals and humans. Do we both have arms, legs, eyes, ears and a nose? Do we both need food, water and sleep?
  • Talk to your child about sources of light. Walk around your environment and point them out: timer switches, clock radio, computer, lamp, light bulb, street lamps, the sun and moon. Which are bright or dim?
  • Link science to real life. Talk about how things were in the past and how scientific advances have brought changes. Share books that show non-electrical or old household appliances.
  • Give your child a collection of items made from different materials – paper, cardboards, plastics, metals – and ask them to find different ways of grouping them (rough, smooth, shiny, dull or plastic, metal, wood, fabric).
  • Point out materials that are found naturally and those that are not (twigs, unpolished/unfinished wood, sand, rocks, water, bone, clay, wool, glass, plastic, paper, cardboard). Ask your child to try sorting the materials into those they thinks are found naturally.
  • Talk to your child about how natural materials are changed to make everyday objects. Use resources to help your child learn about the processes involved.

STEM Ambassador Visit - Science Week 2019

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